Straight from the Source: A Youth View of Social Networking Woes

I love reading essays published by youth. In fact, part of my job consists of working with young writers and getting their work published either online or in print, and it’s extremely rewarding and educational. So I could not resist sharing this post (on Huff Post High School, but originally on TeenInk) from a young person who discusses how her addiction to Facebook interferes with her daily life as a student. While scholars continue to debate on the issue, it’s nice to actually listen to a narrative about experience rather than generalities every once in a while.

The author discusses her struggles with time suck — being drawn into social networking at the expense of getting her assignments done efficiently:

“When I sit down to write an essay, it can take me almost an hour to start my work. “Just one quick look at Facebook,” I think to myself. I then end up on the website for an extended period of time.”

She also gets even more serious when she discusses the need to maintain popularity, but in a way that is essentially false camaraderie:

“These websites are addicting because they give a false sense of community. Users are tricked into believing that they are part of a close group…People become addicted to the high they get when someone acknowledges them on these websites.” 

Even as an, ahem, “older” adult, I can fall into this trap. I sometimes wonder why a particular post of mine goes unnoticed, when I find it highly amusing and/or inspiring; it disappoints me for that moment (I think that’s the strongest word I can honestly write about my reaction, though sometimes my reaction can increase to “bummed”). Conversely, I can feel giddy when I see lots of people responding to something that I posted, especially when I didn’t expect anyone to really notice (So why even do it? That’s a question for another time).

While this story is not meant to infer that all young people suffer from these issues, I think it’s important to be reminded that there are young people who are struggling with, not always embracing, social networking.  And since socializing online is an integral part of the ways in which communities are formed and maintained, it’s important to understand where and when frustration and disconnect exist for youth — those whom older folk often assume celebrate such connections the most.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s